Why did the Christianity eventually spread throughout the Roman Empire?

Ehrman attributes the rapid spread of Christianity to five factors: (1) the promise of salvation and eternal life for everyone was an attractive alternative to Roman religions; (2) stories of miracles and healings purportedly showed that the one Christian God was more powerful than the many Roman gods; (3) Christianity …

What caused Christianity to spread throughout the Roman Empire?

Roman roads and the Pax Romana helped to spread Christianity. … The Roman Emperor Nero began one of the first persecutions of early Christians in AD 64. It was also in the year AD 64 that the Great Fire of Rome burned much of the city. Despite persecutions, Christianity continued to spread throughout the Roman Empire.

Why did Christianity spread after the fall of the Roman Empire?

In 313 C.E., Roman emperor Constantine the Great ended all persecution and declared toleration for Christianity. Later that century, Christianity became the official state religion of the Empire. This drastic change in policy spread this relatively new religion to every corner of the Empire.

How did Christianity expand?

Beginning with the son of a Jewish carpenter, the religion was spread around the world first by Jesus’s disciples, then by emperors, kings, and missionaries. Through crusades, conquests, and simple word of mouth, Christianity has had a profound influence on the last 2,000 years of world history.

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How did Christianity spread answer?

Answer : Christianity spread through the efforts of the twelve Apostles. The followers of Jesus Christ were called Apostles. … Saint Peter even set up a church in Rome which has later become the most famous religious centre of Christians all over the world.

How did Christianity spread across Europe?

The Roman Empire officially adopted Christianity in AD 380. During the Early Middle Ages, most of Europe underwent Christianization, a process essentially complete with the Baltic Christianization in the 15th century.